Robert Evans' Jr Blog

Roofing Valleys Correctly

Posted by Robert Evans on Feb 20, 2019 10:59:42 AM

Welcome to Robert Evans Jr. Contracting

Weaved Valley

Depending on your roof design you may or may not have valleys. A Valley is where 2 roof lines come together. Here is a picture of Robert Evans JR. Contracting Inc. installing a Weaved "Closed valley".  Closed valleys are those where shingles on one or both sides of the roof extend across the valley onto the adjacent roof slope. There is two kinds of closed valleys: cut valleys, which are less expensive to install {due to less waste in material and quicker labor install} and are the most common, and there are woven valleys as you see above in this picture. When Installing the woven method, shingles from both roof slopes run through onto the adjacent slope, alternating with each course. This is done differently with different types of roofing shingles depending on 3-tab, thickness, archtectural type shingles. Woven valleys is not recommended to be installed on a roof pitch less than 4:12. 

Tags: roofing metrowest, Commercial roof, www.certainteed.com, www.gaf.com, roof newton, roofs, CDX plywood, Certainteed Lifetime roof, Architectural shingles, Certainteed Landmark, ice and water barrier, roof Framingham, Gaf, gaf timberline shingles, cobra ridge vent, roof metrowest, roof natick, roof installation, roof leaks, wayland ma., roof leak

Chimney Flashing

Posted by Robert Evans on Oct 13, 2014 2:59:00 PM

Chimney flashing

Chimney Flashing is a vital part of your roof. Robert Evans Jr. Contracting Inc. gets more calls about leaks around chimneys than about any other problem. And more often than not, the culprit is the flashing, the metal that keeps the intersection between the chimney and roof watertight.

Proper flashing around chimney includeds 2 layers. The first is called step flashing: L-shaped aluminum are woven into the shingle courses and lapped up the side of the chimney. Next comes the counterflashing: A second layer of metal usaully consisting of either Lead or Copper. {Most commonly used is Lead} It is embedded in the chimney mortar joints and folded down to cover the top of the step flashing

The corners are especially vulnerable. We usaully cut and bend the lead around the corner. Even with a good quality installation, this leaves one small spot that should be sealed with a high-quality Caulking such as Geocel.

The type of metal used for flashing depends on where you live. Aluminum and galvanized steel are sometimes used. Copper is the longest lived, but because its so expensive, we see it only on higher end jobs. Another advantage to copper is that the corners can be soldered for a watertight connection.

When a chimney is located at the bottom of a roof slope, a cricket should always be installed, a small diversion roof that prevents water from pooling and ponding behind chimney and eventually leading to seeping through roof into your house.

Schedule your FREE Roofing Assessment Today!

Because chimneys are such a potential trouble spot, inspect them once a year or two for loose or missing flashing and cracks in the masonry, or call on Robert Evans Jr. Contracting at 508-877-3500 and have one of our professionals do the inspection for you.  We also recommend that our customers waterproof their brick chimneys every few years with a brick sealer that can be applied with a garden sprayer. This is a great way to keep water from seeping into the brick.

Tags: roofing metrowest, www.certainteed.com, www.gaf.com, roof warranty, Architectural shingles, roof Framingham, attic ventilation, gaf timberline shingles, roof metrowest, roof natick, Re-sheathed, Roof color, Four seasons, standing water, wayland ma., gambrel Style roof, roof leak

Roof Pipe flange replacement

Posted by Robert Evans on Sep 10, 2014 1:27:00 PM

Old worn pipe flange

Roof Pipe flange

This Homeowner in Natick Ma. noticed her ceiling inside one of her closets had a wet water stain. She called Robert Evans Jr. Contracting to come look at the situation. After a quick inspection to the roof area above the leak inside the house, we noticed the rubber gasket around the top of a pipe flange was worn away causing it too allow water inside the house. We removed the old worn pipe flange and installed a new 3" inch pipe flange. Sometimes the pipe flanges dont last aslong as the life of a roof and needs to be replaced. Have your roof inspected today to avoid such problems.

Schedule your FREE Roofing Assessment Today!

Tags: www.certainteed.com, www.gaf.com, roof warranty, roof newton, Architectural shingles, roof Framingham, Rotted roof rafters, roof metrowest, roof natick, roof installation, roof leaks, Roof Safety, pipe flange, roof leak

Rotted roof boards

Posted by Robert Evans on Sep 9, 2014 1:18:00 PM

Rotted Roof Boards

Welcome to Robert Evans Jr. Contracting

When Homeowners let there roof go without inspection or repair , big problems can arise causing a costly roof replacement become even more costly, sometimes doubling the cost !! If your roof has not been inspected within the last 5 years, please contact us for a free roof evaluation.

Schedule your FREE Roofing Assessment Today!

In alot of cases Rotted roof boards go unseen and not noticed till the roof starts leaking inside the house, causing expensive repairs, structural damage, termites. Making your average roof cost double in cost !!

$300 Roofing Coupon

Tags: www.gaf.com, roof warranty, Rotted roof boards, CDX plywood, carpenter, Architectural shingles, Roof selection, attic ventilation, Rotted roof rafters, roof metrowest, roof natick, roof installation, roof leaks, Four seasons, wayland ma., PVC Composite, roof boards

Flat Rubber roof in Massachusetts

Posted by Robert Evans on Jun 25, 2014 12:10:00 PM

describe the image

This Flat Rubber roof in Massachusetts was completed a few years ago by Robert Evans Jr Contracting Inc.

Flat Rubber roofs can last up to 40 years if well maintained by your roofing contractor. All seams, corners, penetrations in roof, and edge flashing should be inspected annually for wear and tear. Any ponding water on your flat roof should be avoided also to keep your roof at peak performance.

Robert Evans Jr. Contracting can take care of all your roofing needs including Flat roofs, Sloped asphalt shingled roofs, siding, windows, and General Contracting.Click me

Tags: roofing metrowest, www.certainteed.com, roof newton, roofs, clapboard siding, CDX plywood, carpenter, certainteed roof, Certainteed Lifetime roof, Architectural shingles, ice and water barrier, roof Framingham, rubber roof, shed dormer, attic ventilation, Gaf, gaf timberline shingles, cobra ridge vent, siding metrowest, roof metrowest, roof natick, roof installation, roof leaks, Milford roof, solar metrowest, Four seasons, harvey replacement windows, Floor guys, Firestone roofing, firestone contractor

Gutter Damaged due to Ice Dam

Posted by Robert Evans on Mar 20, 2014 12:53:00 PM

Welcome to Robert Evans Jr. Contracting

Fascia boardphoto (2)Schedule your FREE Roofing Assessment Today!

This Homeowner called on Robert Evans Jr. Contracting to replace his damaged gutter caused by the heavy weight of an Ice Dam. First we inpected the fascia board for any rot or damage, then re-nailed any loose nails along fascia, After that we installed 46' feet of .032 guage aluminum white gutter fastened with heavy duty tru-fast screws every 16" inches, then attached 2x3 aluminum downpouts on either end.

 

 

 

Tags: Architectural shingles

Roof Snow & Ice Dam Removal Service

Posted by Robert Evans on Dec 16, 2013 10:58:00 AM

Roof Snow & Ice Dam Removal Service
 
Robert Evans Jr Contracting not only repairs and shingles roofs, we also help protect roofs from damage caused by the Harsh New England winters. Robert Evans Jr Contracting provides roof snow removal.  If an ice dam is present, Have the snow above it removed helping the ice dam melt away quicker. 
 
Let Robert Evans Jr Contracting take care of your roof snow safely.  Call us at 508-877-3500 and we can provide a service that will protect your roof.
 
 
What You Need to Know About Ice Dam
 
 
What is an Ice Dam?
 
Process of Ice Dam FormationWhen snow accumulates on a roof, a cycle of melting and refreezing occurs.  The warmer your attic is, the more melting will occur.  Normally, the resulting water would flow off the edge of the roof.  Under certain conditions however, when the outside air temperature is very low, the edge of the roof stays below freezing and the water refreezes when it gets to that point.  This ice then forms a line or "dam," at the edge of the roof.  As more snow melts, it also refreezes when it gets to the "ice dam," and the dam keeps getting bigger.
 
Once the ice dam gets too large, the melted snow that pools up behind it can force its way back under the shingles breaking the seal and the water finds its way into your home causing damage to your ceilings and walls.
 
How to Prevent Ice Dams
 
A good way to prevent ice dams is to lower your attic temperature by installing additional insulation in your attic area.  You can do this by laying out additional layers of insulation across the existing insulation or by having additional insulation blown in.  However, you do need to be careful not to diminish your air return by over insulating.  Without  adequate ventilation through your soffits, heat can build up regardless of the amount of insulation present in your attic.  Make sure your attic vents are not covered with insulation or any other material so that the air moves freely through the soffit vents.  The usual recommendation for venting is 1 square foot of vent for every 150 feet of attic floor area.  If your attic lacks in ventilation, you may need to consider installing ridge vent on the peaks of your roof or cut in additional louvers.  Also, be sure and check that weather-stripping on attic stairways or hatchways are providing a good seal to keep warmth out of the attic. 
 
A common mistake made by some homeowners, is attempting to melt the snow on the roof by leaving their hatchways open to the attic.   The thought behind this is letting the heat from your home up into the attic.  This is actually the worst thing a homeowner could do.  Not only will you be throwing energy dollars away, you are actually contributing to the formation of an ice dam due to the thaw and freezing winter conditions.  As a homeowner, you should find some comfort in seeing standing snow on the roof opposed to ice dams.  Standing snow proves adequate ventilation and insulation is present in your attic.   
 
 
If you have questions or concerns regarding insulation or ventilation in your attic contact Robert Evans Jr Contracting.  We would be more than happy to assist you!
 
 
                                         Signs You May Have an Ice Dam
The appearance of water damage on ceilings or exterior walls may indicate that an ice dam has formed and water has forced it's way into your attic.  Water damage is a serious issue.  It can lead to rotting and mold growth which can cause serious health problems with people living in the home. 
 
To prevent costly interior damage caused by ice dams call Robert Evans Jr Contracting.  We will remove your roof snow too help melt away the ice that will lead to water damage.  Robert Evans Jr Contracting does not advise you to attempt ice dam removal yourself. Robert Evans Jr. Contracting is equipped with quality equipment and OSHA approved protection. 
 
 
The Solution
 
Your best defense against ice dams is removing snow off the roof to prevent refreezing after melting.  If an ice dam has formed, call Robert Evans Jr Contracting  to take care of the problem before it becomes a "bigger" problem. 
 
www.Robertevansjrcontracting.com can safely remove snow from your roof using our expandable roof rake.  If ice is present, we safely remove the ice from your roof without damage to gutters or shingles.  Using hammers or hatchets to remove ice can cause more damage to your roof. 
Schedule your FREE Roofing Assessment Today!

Tags: www.certainteed.com, www.gaf.com, Architectural shingles, ice and water barrier, roof Framingham, cobra ridge vent, ice dam framingham, roof metrowest, roof installation, roof leaks

Window Leaks

Posted by Robert Evans on Dec 12, 2013 1:22:00 PM

Window Leaks

 

1: Very complex window layout and no overhangs.
As you can see above, the window openings in this house are many and complex. There are tall windows, arched windows, bay windows. And this would be fine, providing they were installed with all the bells and whistles (flashings, sealants) that prevent water from leaking in. But the sections of wall that have no overhangs may present a problem. Typically we homeowners think the main functions of overhangs are to create shade and drain water off the roof. But they also keep wind-driven rainwater from pushing into the walls through the windows. If you're ever in the position to design a house or an addition to your house, it's wise to include overhangs. www.Robertevansjrcontracting.com

2: Angled fascia.
With the fascia (the horizontal board above the window) angled inward, it doesn't take too much building knowledge to see that water from the roof will be directed right toward this window. The sloppy flashing (extra-strong insulating material between the window and house framing) gives water even more of an opportunity to seep in. Which leads us to...

Train2Rebuild

3: Poorly installed flashing.
To keep water from getting inside your walls and causing all kinds of trouble, there must be a good integration between the window, the building paper (bottom right and left) and the flashing (the stronger material around the arch). In the picture above, the flashing is cobbled together and each break in its surface creates an opportunity for water to enter. In a correct installation, a stretchable flashing is used in one continuous piece, as opposed to patches.

4: Misuse of materials.
In this case, house wrap (building paper) is being used as the window flashing. For superior water protection, the carpenter should have used specially made flashing material. It's stronger and does a better job around windows than the house wrap, which goes behind the home's siding or brick.

Train2Rebuild

5: No flashing at all.
We have to hope this window was just set into place temporarily and will be removed later so that flashing tape can be installed properly. If flashing tape isn't installed the right way, water will get behind whatever kind of siding is put up (and water always gets behind siding) and then drip behind the mounting flange (the outermost edge of this window frame) and into the walls. It's a good idea to use caulking to seal your windows, in addition to flashing tape.

Train2Rebuild

6: Missing sealant, wrong type of nails.
You can see some sealant (caulk) behind the mounting flange on this window, but not enough. There should be a continuous bead of sealant behind the flange, and it should ooze out of any unfilled nail holes. And about those nails: They are obviously not corrosion-resistant (which is required), as you can already see the rust coming on. Plus, they were shot out of a nail gun (as evidenced by the little orange tab on the left nail). According to many experts, this is not a good practice, as window flanges require a precise fastener pressure and that is hard to control with a tool powered by compressed air.

7: Not shingle style.
If you want to know the secret to moisture management it is this: shingle style. That means that the top layers of a surface overlap the bottom layers. That allows gravity to move water down and away from the structure. If you violate this basic principle and put a top layer behind a bottom layer, you're inviting water to come right in. In the photo above, the white building paper above the window should be lapping over the black flashing. It's possible that with super-wide overhangs, and not much rain and not much wind, this penetration may not leak. But bring on some wind-driven rain and you've got trouble.

Kathy Price-Robinson

8: Cracked glazing putty.
This is easily corrected. Just pry it out and redo it. If not, moisture will continue to deteriorate this wood frame.

9: Lack of a paint seal.
Here's something you may not know: When painting the exterior molding that holds a window into place, the paint should slightly overlap onto the glass. This may seem shocking as we typically do everything possible not to get paint on our windows. But the continuous membrane of the paint from the molding onto the glass creates a seal that is actually part of a moisture protection strategy. Professional painters and savvy DIYers already know this.

For more information on proper window installation, consult the industry bible on this topic, known as ASTM E 2112. ASTM stands for American Society for Testing and Materials, but now it is an international standards organization.

Tags: roofs, Architectural shingles, ice dams, ice and water barrier, commercial roof leaks, Grace Ice and water Barrier, old skylights, harvey replacement windows

Ice Dam

Posted by Robert Evans on Dec 6, 2013 10:11:00 AM

Ice Dam on roofs of buildings and houses

Ice build up on slate roof
Ice dam forming on slate roof

An ice dam, on a smaller scale, is a problem of house and building maintenance in cold climates. An ice dam can occur when snow accumulates on the slanted roof of a house with inadequate insulation. Heat conducted through the insufficient insulation and warm air from the attic bypasses warms the roof and melts the snow on those areas of the roof that are above living spaces, but does not melt the snow on roof overhangs.  Meltwater flows down the roof, under the blanket of snow, onto the eave and into the gutter, where colder conditions on the overhang cause it to freeze. Eventually, ice accumulates along the eave and in the gutter. Snow that melts later cannot drain properly through the ice on the eave and in the gutter, resulting in leaks to the roof space resulting in damaged ceilings, walls, roof structure and insulation. Snow guards or snow retention systems can help prevent ice dams on some roofs. The ice that builds up on the roof can be removed by trained professionals that use special steam equipment to ensure quick and safe removal without causing damage to the roof. www.Robertevansjrcontracting.com

Click me

Tags: Architectural shingles, Certainteed Landmark, ice dams, ice and water barrier, ice dam removal, attic ventilation, cobra ridge vent, ice dam framingham, roof installation

Framingham Elks

Posted by Robert Evans on Oct 28, 2013 8:38:00 PM

The Framingham Elks needed a roof. Upon inspection of the existing roof there was a large amount of standing water it was determined that the roof was not pitched to the drains. A tapered insulation from Firestone was designed to pitch water to the drains. Not only was the roof not pitched right there was no insulation in the old roof. With the new tapered deck an average R-value of 22 was obtained bring the roof up to code. New .040 shop fabricated bronze aluminum was installed around roof edge.

Another design flaw was the HVAC duct work penetrated the roof through the shingle section was not flashed properly. We wrapped the duct work with insulation and white rubber to help with cooling in the summer.

The shingle section was stripped and reshingled with GAF Timberline shingles which have a life time guarantee. photo 15 resized 600photo 17 resized 600photo 13 resized 600photo 12 resized 600

Tags: roofing metrowest, Commercial roof, EPDM, Architectural shingles, commercial roof leaks, roof Framingham, rubber roof, roof metrowest, Firestone roofing, firestone roof, firestone contractor, firestone rubber roof